Part 1

Research

Sept 13th, 2018

Futurism, Hair and wrap. These were the three things given to my group as we were sent out mapping different ideas. The definition of futurism on google is along the lines of, 'an artistic movement begun in Italy in 1909, which strongly rejected traditional forms and embraced the energy and dynamism of modern technology launched by Filippo Marinetti.'

The First book I picked up didn't really delve into futurism as much as it analyzed its influence within the art world. Defining it as a free language born out of wanting to break free where word and text defy real life constructs for example collage. Which makes you confront meaning with images that are familiar to the subject and grounded within his/her world. However the next book I read was packed with images of artwork born out of this movement from people.

It held Filipo Marinetti's actually definition which is, 'A mental discipline pursuing perpetual regeneration of all things, the utmost integration of human life with the logic of becoming'. This immediately triggered a connection between his view of futurism and Ayn Rand's philosophy on the morality of man. Which is a morality based on logic and mans life as a standard value where his/her mind acts a way of survival and he is led by his own mind. (* Every since reading Ayn Rand's book "The Fountainhead" and "Atlas Shrugged" I can't help but see such a strong connection between her ideas and futurism). She rejected collectivism stating it is a system where everybody is enslaved by everybody and Marinetti's futurism was born out of being sick of following the same rules of art and literature and politics and etc. That we must redefine the attitude of man to lead his own self and not follow others only in an endless cycle of recycles ideas or attitudes where no one can express themselves subjectively but instead as a community where everybody is not there own, but a part of, not an individual, but just one link. Futurism was a period of undiluted energy and creativity, which I could see within the pieces of Anton Guilo's, "The Roses" or  "The Bow" and Want Wulz, "Me + Cat". People were so uninhibited and free in their expression all creating things not born of things taught and dead ideas but a regeneration of self and a belief in ones own ability. After completing the research I started to gather some inspiration from the work I had done the previous day. It was a trial attempting to depict my idea of futurism in a collectivist society using paper, ink and tape. The individuals were line drawings and taped to the sheet as though they were trapped on the paper. Then I cut up pieces of green paper as a representation of their expressive selves seeping out of them looking for freedom. For the final piece I created a backdrop of hair through tape marked with ink on its back and front as the chaotic individuals hair was unraveling to reveal a more chaotic self. The 'self' were white pieces of paper folded in different ways with ink splayed on the cover. The intent is to make it look like a burst of energy and frustration escaping the paper as they are all connected in chaos through the 'hair'. To add some color I made some bold caricatures of people that while may be physical exaggerations express something residing within them internally that has festered and turned into bitterness. It didn't mesh with the piece well and so I tried cutting them and playing them on the page but that didn't work either so I had to scrap the idea. My idea remained as it was with ink and paper.

*there was a book called, "Lets murder the moonshine" that talked about futurism and I couldn't check it out but I'll write about it later on

 

Sept 16, 2018

For the week within fashion and textile the class was given designers to Research (Vionnet, Balenciaga, Pierre Cardin, Alexander McQueen, Issey Miyake, Rei Kawakubo, Yohji Yamamoto, and Hussein Chalayan)

 

Vionnet- Classy silhouette, first to cut fabric on bias, gowns flowed like water as she rejected boning and rubber, etc; draped across body and expressed bodies natural and given beauty rather than shaping it; clothes inspired by greek sculptures and Art Deco;

Vionnet continued to impress the world with her sartorial skills and ability to experiment with elegance. During the twenties Vionnet invented the bias cut, a technique of cutting fabric diagonal to the grain of the fabric, causing it to cling to the body while moving with the wearer. Vionnet’s new technique revolutionized women’s clothing and she was given the title of “architect among dressmakers”. Influenced by Isadora Duncan and ancient Greek art, Vionnet’s simple styles were designed to match the curves of a woman’s body, echoing the fluidity and motion. Her designs continued to impact the fashion world throughout the following decades. Liberating the female body from corsets, Vionnet believed the dress must take on the wearer’s personality. Modernising the women’s wardrobe, Vionnet exemplified creative, iconic fashion.

 

src: https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/education/madeleine-vionnet-1876-1975

http://www.catwalkyourself.com/fashion-biographies/madaleine-vionnet/

Balenciaga- Cristóbal Balenciaga was from Spain, he was one of the best (or the actual best) tailor in Paris, clothing was extravagant, His work has been called sculpture, architecture, and even furniture. It has been praised for its “austere simplicity.” it was only in 1952 that he produced a game-changeras “the semi-fitted look,” it was tailored at the front, but billowing at the back. It led to the Baby Doll and mini skirts of Courrèges and Mary Quant as well as the space-age fantasies of Pierre Cardin. Balenciaga can, with justification, be called the father of late 20th century fashion.

 

src: https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/education/cristobal-balenciaga-1895-1972

 

Pierre Cardin- He's italian. Cardin created costumes for film director Jean Cocteau and cut his teeth at haute couture houses Schiaparelli and Christian Dior. The bubble dress is what launched his career. it was in the 1960s that Cardin brought to life the Space Age designs for which he is best known. But Cardin wasn’t just innovative when it came to fabric and form. He was the ‘king of firsts’: the first couturier to create unisex clothing and to launch a ready-to-wear collection.

(I visited his exhibit in Paris which showcase furniture and clothing made by him, which I will attach)

src: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/fashion/brands/pierre-cardin/about-the-designer/

 

Alexander McQueen- Alexander McQueen was born in 1970 in the East End of London - the son of a taxi driver. He left school at 16 and trained on Savile Row at Gieves & Hawkes. He earned his master's degree in fashion design from London's Central Saint Martins. In 1992 McQueen debuted a pair of trousers that redefined the traditional cut of the garment. He called them “bumster” trousers. McQueen was John Galliano's successor at Givenchy in 1996.

 

src: https://www.vogue.co.uk/article/alexander-mcqueen-biography

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Alexander-McQueen

 

Issey Miyake- Issey Miyake was born on April 22, 1938, in Hiroshima, Japan. Miyake’s first encounter with design was in his home-town of Hiroshima in which were two bridges: to live and to die, situated near the epicenter where the Atomic Bomb hit. (Built in 1952, and later renamed: to Createand to Go.) Walking over the bridges, watching them, was his first encounter with a design’s ability to inspire powerful emotional responses; and hope. After studying haute couture, he worked as an assistant at two fashion houses. He witnessed the May 1968 Paris riots, an event that inspired a determination to create clothing for a wider range of people. From the outset, Miyake’s creative process has been based upon the concept of “one piece of cloth.”

 

src: http://mds.isseymiyake.com/im/en/work/

 

Rei Kawakubo: Rei Kawakubo is the creative director of Comme des Garçons. she studied art and literature at Keio University.  After college she took a position in an acrylic fibre textile manufacturer. She was given creative freedom by her superior there and became involved in collecting props and costumes for photo shoots. That activity ultimately led her to design her own fashions when she could not find an appropriate costume for a shoot. In 1967 she became a freelance stylist. Her clothes were designed for the independent woman who did not dress to seduce or gain a man’s approval. Kawakubo recoiled from Western definitions of sexiness, which focused on revealing and exposing the body. She found revealing clothing decidedly unsexy and boring. During the late 1970s Kawakubo started a professional and romantic relationship with fellow Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto. They both produced clothes that redefined fashion and challenged conceptions of feminine beauty. The two debuted separate collections in Paris in 1981 and shocked the critics. The garments were dark (primarily black), oversized, and asymmetrical, and they twisted and bulged and otherwise did not conform to the lines of the human body. Kawakubo and Yamamoto continued to collaborate for several years and, together with Issey Miyake, were considered Japan’s most innovative fashion designers.She is also co-founder of cult retail destination Dover Street Market, which she and her husband Adrian Joffe established in 2004.

 

src: https://www.businessoffashion.com/community/people/rei-kawakubo

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Rei-Kawakubo

 

Yohji Yamamoto- Born in Tokyo, Yamamoto graduated from Keio University with a degree in law in 1966. His mother was a dressmaker. For his further studies, he studied fashion design at Bunka Fashion College. For the next few years, he worked from the back of his mother’s boutique and in 1977 launched his debut collection, Y’s, in Tokyo,His career as a professional designer started in 1981 from Paris. In an interview with New York Times during 1983, the designer expressed his idea of dressing women in men’s clothing. His wanted to design men’s coats for women so their body stays hidden and guarded from cold wind or men’s sight. He is constantly exploring the connection between the feminine and masculine, and creates clothes for women with an intellectual or artistic bent.

 

src: yohji yamamato bio

 

Hussein Chalayan- 

Oft lauded as one of the most cerebral designers of his era, Hussein Chalayan’s innovative mix of design, science and art in creating his fantastical seasonal collections has won the designer significant acclaim and exhibitions in some of the leading design and art museums around the world.

The seminal designer’s futuristic designs have included dresses containing moving airplane parts, a robot dress loaded with Swarovski crystals and Tyvek garments that resembled furniture and could be folded down to envelope size. They have been showcased in museums such as the Palais du Louvre, London’s Design Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo. 

Having undertaken a foundation course at Warwickshire School of Arts, Chalayan began studying at London’s prestigious Central Saint Martins in 1989, quickly earning a name as one of the most radical design students within his class. In 1993, the budding designer’s final graduation collection, entitled the ‘Tangent Flows’, presented an artfully decomposed and rusted sartorial offering that had been buried underground for six weeks with iron fillings. The collection was bought in its entirety by high-fashion boutique Browns, who showcased the collection in their window displays. In 1994, having completed an internship with Savile Row tailor Timothy Everest, the Cypriot designer established his own company, Cartesia Ltd., and his namesake ready-to-wear line, Chalayan, exhibiting his first collection in London’s West Soho Galleries that spring and debuting at London Fashion Week to resounding critical acclaim.

 

src: https://www.businessoffashion.com/community/people/hussein-chalayan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxOuOMcNvSU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ae81FcczsI8

Sept 23rd, 2018

Before delving into Fine Arts for the week the class was instructed to view collections within the Tate and form our own opinion before and after gathering information on the pieces. The first piece that struck me was, "From Here I Saw What Happened and Cried", by Carrie Mae Weems. Constructed like a piece of text or poetry where the images are diluted with a red filter and the words are etched into glass encasing the photos in meaning. Poetry uses a concentrated blend of sound and imagery to create a response as the words evoke images. But Carries photos and words just reinforce each other and bounce off each other to strengthen an image of oppression. Each image is a statement and time progresses in the photos to a modern age however the circumstances are the same, returning the speaker of the piece to the present at the end. The way the room is set up is crucial in that the end and beginning point meet when you finish reading the text. This imitate how this injustice is cyclical. It starts off slow, very short sentences but nonetheless sharp then builds into longer statements, into poetry filled with words thick with sound and alliteration.

 

The 'Shape of Light' exhibit is about condensing photography into art by skewing our perception of physical objects or combing it with other mediums and techniques to transform physical entities into two dimensional scenes. There was a wall filled with examples of chemigrams and photograms, both techniques exploring a more abstract approach by capturing objects with light or its absence, producing organic shapes overlapping and contradicting in their thickness. 

 

Andre Kertesz's "distortion" series really inspired me in how these naked bodies morph into something alien as they mimic the structure around them and became a part of it. He uses a funhouse mirror to makes these photographs, making it seems like they took place in a surrealistic landscape. 

 

Edward Ruscha's photo series, "Parking Lots" 1967-2013 look like the inside of cells or an organized mess of shape differentiated by changes in black and white. Due to the angle of the camera from atop these buildings in a helicopter presumably the images appear two dimensional and really flat lacking depth but showing a lot of rhythm in the carving of the files, buildings and greenery. He manages to make something like structure and our world seem like a collage of shapes bordering on Dadaism or cubism. 

 

Sandra Gamarra's piece of, "Page 70 2006", is a painting depicting a real life scene of multiple tv's playing throughout a living room. The space is painting in tones of brown and grey while the tv's are a stark contrast in their blue light. Its as though the tv's are guests in the house and may be representation of people in conversation. The painting is a reproduction of a work by Candice Brietz who uses Hollywood films and tv in her practice. Gammara takes this full circle by appropriating Brietz's work just as she appropriate Hollywood and tv culture. 

Oct 22nd, 2018

The class was assigned to delve into functionality within clothing for example military wear, workwear etc. However I wanted to approach it from product design and how one could change the way clothes are actually made or how tools can be integrated into the garment. I wasn't able to venture into all the topics however some highlights are wallets, tools for the hair, weapons and Chinese fans. For wallets I looked at older versions where hooks were used to holds keys. And I thought of how one could have hooks placed at different points with the clothing being warped around. And for Hair I looked at how braids are woven in that they are stretched and joined at one section and how I could mimic that would clothing. Or hair pins and how they could hold they clothing and determine the shape. For weapons I looked at handles of swords and how their shape could be applied to garments. And holsters in how the way they function could be mimicked in how one could unsheath and sheath parts of their body. For Chinese fans I looked at the process of how they open and close hoping to mimic that with clothes in that they could be folded into points and unfolded. 

Sept 13t, 2018

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Sept 16th, 2018

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Oct 21st, 2018 ( 1 )

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Oct 22nd, 2018

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